Walking the talk can be a challenge

Being a role model is an inherent part of being in a managerial or leadership position – your team looks up to you and expects you to lead the way in behavior and values. This topic often comes up in management & leadership workshops. From time to time I see delegates back away from being a role model but mostly it is accepted as “blindingly obvious”.

However when you dig beneath the surface, being a role model can be a serious challenge – as can be seen in recent newspaper headlines when organisations say one thing about their values but behave differently when problems occur.

Here are some challenges that I often encounter in organisations:-

  • The need to be constantly self-aware of actions and their impact on others.
  • When actions & behavior fall below an organisation’s (or personal) values they are addressed promptly and in a public way with those impacted.
  • Organisational values and cultures change over time and behavior needs to change accordingly.
  • When I see others failing to be a role model, I call it out.
  • Situations that potentially damage our reputation or commercial interests when we put our self-interest above our values.
  • Accepting that we are all human and make mistakes. It is how we deal with those mistakes that really demonstrate our values.

Walking the talk is easy to say but to do so requires courage and determination.

If you are interested in learning more about how we can help your organisation develop a values based culture, then get in touch with us today.

 

There is no them, only us

Like most people, having never been to a real prison, my knowledge of the prison system was limited to the often depressing news about them and their residents. That changed last week when I had the privilege of visiting Portland prison in Dorset with the youth offending rehabilitation charity, Key4life. There I met 30 young men who were serving time at this forbidding looking prison perched on top of a windswept cliff overlooking the English Channel. It felt isolated and on the very edge.

It is easy to think of offenders as being different from us – outsiders, poorly educated, drug-addicted, violent, dangerous and well….just criminal. But spend a day with them and you will find that we are more alike than we think.

They want their lives to be better
They want to provide for, and protect, their family
They want to do meaningful work
They get frustrated about things they can’t control
They want to be respected and valued
They want to have a voice and to be heard
They want their lives to have meaning
They miss their friends and family
They grieve for those they have lost
They want to love and be loved
They want to have a place to call home

They sound a lot like you and me…perhaps we are more similar than we think.

If you think we are more alike, visit the Key4life website at www.key4life.org.uk.

Small business owners – getting on with the job

BrexitFollowing the vote to leave the EU in June, you might have thought that Armageddon was just around the corner. We are doomed, the economy will crash, it will take years to negotiate an exit, EU countries will punish us with high tariffs….

But Britain’s small business owners, in my experience, have pretty much ignored the background noise. In fact they have been …

  • chasing up leads & identifying new potential customers
  • keeping an eye on costs
  • monitoring profit margins
  • training staff to develop their skills
  • increasing value to clients with new products and services
  • building relationships with other organisations
  • looking for new suppliers
  • providing excellent customer service
  • checking out competitors
  • looking at export markets now that sterling has fallen
  • adjusting prices to reflect input costs from overseas suppliers
  • doing their accounts
  • paying bills and salaries
  • dealing with issues
  • answering the phone

…and working hard to provide an income for them and their families.

In fact small business owners know the only person they can rely on is themselves and their staff. They don’t wait around for governments to make decisions or for EU negotiations to start…

They just get on with the job

P.S. My business is a small business and I have been getting on with the job too. I have done pretty much all of the above AND wrote this blog entry.

What can we learn from Olympic performers?

Discobolus of MyronI was at the gym the other day running on a treadmill while watching the women’s marathon. Normally I run at a modest 10 kph pace which keeps up my fitness without killing me. But on this occasion I noticed I was running faster and needed to increase the treadmill speed. The strange thing was not feeling as if I was working harder than normal and that made me wonder why.

As I was cooling off, I realized that I had been following along in the foot steps of the marathon runners without consciously knowing that I was doing anything different or working harder. So simply by watching others perform my own performance improved.

Does this apply in the business world?

Absolutely. Finding and following in the footsteps of people we admire can have a very positive impact on our performance. We’ve all worked with colleagues who can show us how to better handle difficult people or go about a challenging project. So surround yourself with Olympic quality colleagues and watch your skills and abilities improve.

[Editor’s note: Peter seems to be suggesting he was running at the same pace as the women marathon runners and frankly he is deluding himself. The winner’s average pace was 17.58kph over 2 hours and 24 minutes. Somewhat faster than Peter has ever run in his life.]

You are good at your job

I am good at my jobHow hard is this  to say out loud? Acknowledging that you are good at something can be difficult – what if people disagree with you, what if you are wrong, what if they laugh at you?

I was working with a client recently who was clearly a very talented and dedicated individual. Without question they were good at their job. When I mentioned this in passing they were extremely reluctant to acknowledge the truth despite all the evidence. This got me thinking that despite all the evidence to the contrary people often lack confidence.

So what is the evidence that you are good at your job?

The signs of being good at your job are easy to see, you just need to look for them. Here are a few:-

  1. Your team respect you and work hard for you if you are a manager
  2. Your boss respects your opinion even if they disagree or override your views
  3. You get a good appraisal
  4. You have been promoted
  5. Your clients give you good feedback and come back for more
  6. Your peers respect you
  7. You got a pay rise recently
  8. You are happy at work (happy people are good at their jobs)

These are all simple things but each one is a vote to say

“You ARE good at your job”

It’s not your fault but it might be your responsibility

Seth Godin’s blog on Sunday was very short and to the point.

“It’s not your fault…but it might be your responsibility. That’s a fork in the road on the way to becoming a professional.”

I would like to add the following.

“That’s a fork in the road …”

…for deciding not to point the finger of blame.
…for accepting a leadership role in your organisation.
…for helping a colleague who is in need.
…on the way to becoming more Emotionally Intelligent.
…on the way to becoming a better person.
…on the way to a better career.

Speaking English can seriously impact your business

In the last 2 years, I trained over 400 international managers and executives from organisations as diverse as NGOs, engineering manufacturers and global entertainment businesses. What did these people have in common? English is not their first language.

The main challenge international managers face is confidence. Senior managers and executives usually have a confidence based on a total understanding of their local culture, a confidence in their business knowledge & skills and a confidence in being able to communicate perfectly. But when they start working in English that confidence can quickly disappear. They can become hesitant and uncertain. They start becoming concerned about understanding the situation correctly, concerned about whether they can say what they want and concerned about how they appear to their international business colleagues. And while they are worrying about all these communication challenges, they are getting distracted from actually doing business.

I would go further and say that their ability to do business is seriously undermined.

This is a strong statement but let me justify it with a little help from the field of neuroscience. In Nobel Prize winning author Daniel Kahneman’s book “Thinking, Fast and Slow” he talks about two styles of thinking – intuitive, fast and seemingly effortless thinking (system 1) and conscious reasoned thinking that requires effort (system 2). What does this mean in reality? Well look at the following image.

Angry woman - Thinking Fast and Slow

What emotion is this woman showing and is she going to say something nice or unpleasant? As soon as you looked at this picture you knew she was angry and when she speaks it is likely to be something nasty and unpleasant. How did you reach this conclusion? You probably just ‘felt’ it rather than consciously worked through the options and coming to a logical solution. Now look at the following problem:

17 x 24 = ?

What is the answer? Well unless you are an extraordinary person, you probably won’t be able to answer instantly. You could work it out with a pen and paper (or a calculator) but it will take some conscious effort.

The picture is an example of thinking fast and the maths problem is an example of thinking slow.

Do you speak ‘fast’ or ‘slow’ English?

What type of thinking do you use when speaking your native language? Your intuitive, unconscious fast thinking (system 1) of course. Speaking your native language seems effortless. What about speaking English? What type of thinking do you use? A lot of people have to use ‘slow’ thinking (system 2), carefully considering the vocabulary and sentences before speaking. The problem is not just that you think or talk slower. ‘Slow’ thinking requires more effort and this has an impact on your overall ability to think clearly as you become mentally tired. Tired people make poor decisions. So speaking ‘slow’ English impacts your ability to do business.

How can you improve this situation?

The best way to speak ‘fast’ intuitive natural English is to practice using your business English in a real life situation. This is the best way to develop the language skills needed to succeed in business. So instead of going to a language school where you will be drilled in vocabulary and sentence structures, take a business course instead.

The business courses I have developed are the perfect solution to this challenge. Whether you want to develop your leadership skills, improve your negotiation or take a business masterclass covering key strategic business tools, we have courses tailored specifically to help you. Get in touch today to find out more.